Angel Flight pilots give because they care and want to help those in need. As one pilot said, “At the end of the day, after you land and put the plane away, it’s great to go home with a sense that you’ve done a little good.?
She really enjoyed the flight—the lollipop too! The pilots made her feel at home and took time to explain all about the patchwork landscape she was viewing far below.
Pilot and passengers are all smiles as they depart on another flight of hope. Angel Flight pilots are highly trained and certified according to the most stringent safety standards.
A future Angel Flight pilot prepares for takeoff. Some forty percent of the passengers flown are children, but patients of all ages board Angel Flight planes to access distant, specialized medical treatment.
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Our mission and purpose statement

To ensure that no patient in need is denied access to distant specialized medical evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, or rehabilitation for lack of a means of long-distance medical air transportation.

Angel Flight Mid-Atlantic provides medical air transport for patients departing from: District of Columbia, Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.

Latest news

AFMA Receives Award

For its remarkable service in helping those in need, Angel Flight of Virginia was one of the volunteer organizations recognized on April 25, 2013 by Volunteer Hampton Roads. CEO and President Ed Boyer (holding award), Board Chairman Steve Patterson and Director of Public Affairs Suzanne Rhodes were honored to receive the award at a banquet held in Norfolk.

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We have partnered with Give Back America to help raise money for our organization, all at no extra cost to our supporters.

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The Pilots Have Been Wonderful

Jaime RevelFor years, Jamie R. was told, “It’s all in your head,” “You should see a psychiatrist,” “There’s nothing wrong with you.” Medical tests like MRIs would always come back negative.

It’s that way for many rare disease patients living far away from advanced medical facilities. Jamie, 35, resides in the small city of London in southeast Kentucky.

“I ran out of places to turn,” she says.

Growing up, she suffered from migraines and had unusual flexibility in her body. “I always thought it was normal to be so ‘bendy,’” she said, adding that family members were extremely flexible as well. “My grandfather could put his feet behind his head.” Over time, the headaches became worse, and by 2011, they had increased in frequency and severity. “I was eating Advil,” she said.

Then one day “I got a headache that didn’t go away.” Vertigo set in as well as other symptoms. “It just got worse and worse. I had to quit driving. I couldn’t walk without assistance. I stayed on the couch or on the bed.” She said she developed blurred and double vision and had to quit her job as an executive administrative assistant. “I went from working 50-60 hours a week and doing my own art business [Akari Studios] on the side” to producing only small art projects.” Jaime’s specialty was large stained glass pieces. Read the rest of this entry »

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